Help Disabled & Terminally Ill People to Prevent Assisted Dying Reform

by Phil Friend

Help Disabled & Terminally Ill People to Prevent Assisted Dying Reform

by Phil Friend
Phil Friend
Phil is severely disabled himself and works alongside many other disabled people who are opposed to a change in the law on assisted suicide.
9
days to go
£3,255
pledged of £20,000 stretch target by 48 people
Pledge now
Phil Friend
Phil is severely disabled himself and works alongside many other disabled people who are opposed to a change in the law on assisted suicide.
Pledge now

This case is raising funds for its stretch target. Your pledge will be collected within the next 24-48 hours (and it only takes two minutes to pledge!)

Who are we? 

Not Dead Yet UK is a small UK-based network of disabled activists who oppose attempts to change the current laws on assisted suicide.

Opposition to assisted suicide is not confined to the medical profession and religious groups. Most importantly our campaigns always include the very people who would be most affected by any change in legislation.

We are raising funds to make legal interventions in crucial assisted dying cases which are currently in the courts. Please support us by contributing now and sharing this page. 

Background

There have been a number of attempts to change the law to legalise assisted suicide for disabled and terminally ill people. Parliament has debated the issue several times and has recognised the dangers associated with these changes and preferred to support better medical research, palliative care and ultimately recognise the value that disabled people can bring to an inclusive society.

Despite Parliament's opposition, very well funded cases have been brought on behalf of two individuals who would like other people to be able to assist them to die without the risk of legal prosecution for murder. Not Dead Yet UK was permitted to make representations on behalf of disabled and terminally ill people in the Conway case which was successful in maintaining the law as it currently stands.

Why is this so important?

We believe that a change in law will leave disabled and terminally ill people at far greater risk and increase their feeling of vulnerability and worthlessness. Having a seriously debilitating condition does not necessarily mean that life is not worth living.With the right support severely disabled people can and do lead fulfilling lives and play their part in making the world a better place. We want people to be encouraged to live, not encouraged to die.

We know of disabled people who when seriously ill have had Do Not Resuscitate Notices applied without their knowledge presumably because relatives and medical professionals believe that their lives are not worth living. We have heard stories from disabled people about relatives suggesting that they are a burden or that they should put an end to their "suffering". A change in the law would mean that disabled people in these situations would be at far greater risk.

What legal work is required and how much will it cost? 

Our legal work is undertaken with pro bono (free) time from leading disability discrimination, equality and human rights lawyers Catherine Casserley of Cloisters Chambers, and Chris Fry of Fry Law. However, we now know that the legal challenge in Conway is to be appealed and that another case of Omid is proceeding. 

It is vital that Not Dead Yet UK is able to maintain its voice through these Court cases, but even with free legal time, the expenses of maintaining our presence at Court are substantial. We want to initially raise £7,500.00 towards interventions in these legal cases. Any funds which are not required for Court costs and expenses will be channelled into Not Dead Yet UK promoting awareness of the dangers of changes to the assisted dying laws.

We desperately need your support. If you help us with a donation we will be able to continue our fight to ensure the safety and well-being of some of the most vulnerable people in our society.


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