Dublin Convention Case: Reunite us with our son!

by Ameen and Rania

Dublin Convention Case: Reunite us with our son!

by Ameen and Rania
Ameen and Rania
Case Owner
Ameen and Rania are an elderly Syrian refugee couple who fled from Syria after the threat to their lives increased and their home was bombed in April 2013. They want to be reunited with their son.
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Ameen and Rania
Case Owner
Ameen and Rania are an elderly Syrian refugee couple who fled from Syria after the threat to their lives increased and their home was bombed in April 2013. They want to be reunited with their son.
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Ameen and his wife Rania are an elderly Syrian refugee couple who fled from Syria after the threat to their lives increased and their home was bombed in April 2013. They were subsequently resettled in England by the UN Resettlement  Scheme.  They have three sons, two of who are settled in other countries.  Their youngest son, Saeed, aged 28, who became separated from them, is now in Greifswald camp, Germany. 

Saeed initially tried to get to Germany to be with his brother, and was hoping to bring his parents out too, but was arrested in Bulgaria. He was detained there for 111 days where he suffered  ill-treatment and abuse. He was granted  asylum in Bulgaria,  but travelled to Germany to be closer to his family. Unfortunately, he was denied status in Germany, and is still detained. 

Ameen and Rani are extremely worried about Saeed, and their separation from each other has caused a lot of anxiety and distress. Dependence on each other and mutual care is culturally paramount in Kurdish Syrian families, and without this close family support, Ameen and Rani have struggled to settle into their new life in the UK.

High stress levels and frequent emotional breakdowns have affected this elderly couple, and their concern for their son weigh heavily on their overall physical and mental wellbeing. Rania cries everyday for the loss of her son, and she worries about how they will cope if one of them becomes seriously ill. Already, Ameen’s memory is fading and he also suffers from osteoarthritis. 

They desperately need to have their son around to assist in their physical and emotional well being before it is too late. 

Medical research identifies that elderly traumatised people have an increased mortality rate, and Ameen and Rania could succumb to irretrievable and inimical harm unless they are urgently reunited with their son. 

Your support for will help apply to reunite Saeed with his family so that he can not only provide the support that his parents need but he himself will be able to settle into a country that can provide him with family unity and the opportunity to support his family, as well as the stability he  deserves after the traumas he himself has already experienced.  

Key points to note:

•    The son Saeed has been in a precarious situation in Griefswald refugee camp since 2015. He has suffered trauma and depression alone with his life on hold. 

•    Ameen and Rania are isolated and suffer from physical and mental health issues. They need family close to them as they grow old. 

•    Reuniting Saeed with his parents will ensure a safer and happier future. Saeed will be able to contribute to UK society and care for his elderly parents. He can start to rebuild his life, close to his parents. 

With your pledge, our legal team, from Trent Chambers will be able to take the first urgent steps needed to prepare the claim, including for specialist reports and to make the Dublin Convention application.

Words from the family: 

Ameen: ‘I can’t describe the severity of this feeling. Family life has always been an essential part of our family activities and interests. Today we find ourselves completely alone without our children or even relatives or friends nearby.’

Rania: ‘My husband and I are in old age and with a lot of illnesses. We don’t rule out death, but I can’t tell you how much anxiety I have when I imagine my husband’s death before me, as I told you before, I don’t know how to do many things outside of the home on my own, I do not speak English and I do not know how to use electronic appliances and the computer therefore this would mean a real disaster for me, the presence of my son would certainly be a support for me.’ 

 Names have been changed in order to preserve the identity of the family.

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